June 28th, 2007

Roman

Traveling with animals

Traveling with companion animals is getting easier, especially with the help of the web. The Best Friends website provides a link to Pets on the Go, a site that offers advice, over 30,000 locations where companion animals are welcome, and a great deal more. You can search the database for a pet-friendly motel in the city you are visiting. You can also add locations.

I've mentioned before just how friendly Motel 6 is toward animals. We learned of the ultimate acceptance from a Motel 6 from one of the Best Friends rescuers. He was traveling across country with 18 pit bulls. They were in crates. The rescuer told the Motel 6 staff what animals he would be bringing into his room and they were fine with it. He hauled every crate into his room and stacked them there, and ultimately only had about an hour's sleep. I have trouble even imagining this journey, and it certainly puts my own in perspective.

I keep Bullet in a large carrier, with a small litter box inside. I think he'd be happier if he had the run of the back seat but my car is not equipped to confine him to that location. If I were planning to travel a lot with a cat I'd seriously consider changing cars or getting a grate to install between the front and back seats. Some cats actually enjoy car travel. I would not count Bullet among them.

About.com has a page with links about traveling with cats. Unfortunately, some of the links no longer work - I wonder how often about.com people update their stuff - and the information is a bit short on details. The Cat Site is, I find, more helpful, and answers my question about litter boxes. When we get on the road again, tomorrow, I will leave the litter box outside, on the floor, instead of inside the cat carrier. Then we will stop every few hours, which is what I do anyway, to get my legs working again, and let Bullet out into the car, offering him a chance to use the litter box. The Cat Site has helpful information on helping your cat adjust to the whole concept of travel in a car or on an airplane, as well as using pet transportation companies.


Roman

OtRwC Day 18, Part 1: Zee Beeg Hole

Tuesday after our volunteer time Elaine and I hit the road for the Grand Canyon. Elaine has been to the south rim, in the winter. I have not, although I passed the road to it more than once when traveling across country as a young adult. So we were both excited to see the north rim, which is only about 75 miles from Kanab. Seventy-five easy miles, at that, much of it climbing gently through forest.

We had an easy trip in and to the park center. From there we took a short hike to a view point called Bright Angel Point. The walk is paved and about a half-mile total, as I recall, and draws many people. These pictures are all from this short hike. It wasn't the clearest day or the clearest time of day, and pollution has affected the views in general, but still.

 Collapse )
Roman

OtRwC Day 18, Part 2: Going to the dogs, again

Perhaps it's fitting that we both started and ended our volunteer time with dogs. We went to a different part of Dog Town today, though, a place where dogs not suitable for children are kept. Mostly these are rambunctious, strong dogs who can knock a child over. Sometimes they are just afraid of those little terrors. We met some of each. All that we met wore green collars, which means they are safe for volunteers, safe for just about anything - except children. Collapse )